Sterilisation reversal

What is sterilisation reversal?

Sterilisation is a permanent method of female contraception which involves blocking both fallopian tubes to stop you from becoming pregnant and means you will no longer need to use other forms of contraception.

For many reasons, some women want the sterilisation reversed and the reversal operation rejoins each of the fallopian tubes. This cannot be achieved, however, if the fallopian tubes have been removed in the original operation.

What does this involve?

The procedure usually takes one to two hours under general anaesthetic and involves delicate surgery. Your surgeon will make a bikini line incision of around 10cms across your lower abdomen. If you have been sterilised using clips, then these are removed and the fallopian tubes are joined together in two layers although sometimes it is only feasible to do the operation to one tube. The wound is closed in layers with delicate stitches.

When will I recover?

You are likely to need one to two nights in hospital after the operation and you will be given painkillers to make you comfortable and to take home with you.
You should take the first week at home very easy and then gradually get back to normal activities probably within a month.

What risks should I know about?

Sterilisation reversal in a routinely performed operation and your surgeon will discuss possible complications with you. These may include bruising around the wound which is common and does not need treatment and occasionally there may be some infection which can be treated with antibiotics.

If you miss a period and think you may be pregnant then you should perform a pregnancy test. When you are about six weeks pregnant you will need an ultrasound scan to make sure the pregnancy is in the womb.

{{model.Locations[0].PriceFrom}}